Triennale di Milano – 2016 | “If you think about it, an egg is like a solidified uterus, and the apparent great difference between oviparous and viviparous species is simply a matter of the consistency of the outer membrane. If we then tried to plunder our remotest amniotic memories, it would be easy to show that our earliest perception of space occurred while we were floating about in the warm hollow of an ovoid form and that every concept of domesticity is geared to recreating that condition. However, unlike the gestational sac, the egg retains its formal and aesthetic dignity even after it has carried out its function. Perhaps this is why mankind has always been fascinated by its shape, and why all its vital potential has always been associated with the idea of perfection. Art has celebrated its iconic value, and architecture – especially when endeavouring to predict the future – has seen its ovoid shape as the perfect formal synthesis. I tried to imagine a bedroom made of leather with highend saddlery fittings inside a chrome eggshell.

The ovoid shape and its reflective power are selling points, and the colour and warmth of the leather literally engulf the visitor, who finds himself inside himself, looking out from within. Let us not forget that sleep is the space-time threshold that carries us back to our original amniotic immersion by night, yet compels us to be reborn each day, more human and more sentient than ever.”